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20 Classic Truck Facts: How Well Do You Know Chevy & GMC Trucks?

Over the years, we've had many conversations with fellow classic car and truck enthusiasts about the history of our favorite vehicles. When we're speaking with someone who has decades of experience studying and working on classic cars, the conversation often brings up some interesting and little-known facts. In this article, we'll share 20 classic truck facts about Chevy and GMC pickups. Some of them are relatively well-known, while others are very obscure. See how many you know, and keep them in mind next time you're chatting with another classic truck fan.

Mopar Paint: Dodge & Plymouth High-Impact Paint Colors

The late 1960s and early 1970s were a groundbreaking time for American culture, music, and of course cars. Many consider this to be the pinnacle of the muscle car era, a period when vehicles were getting wilder than ever before, with aggressive styling, raucous V8 engines, and eye-catching color schemes. Mopar cars were at the forefront of this movement, and have become famous for their High-Impact colors that debuted between 1969 and 1971. Today, we'll be looking back at these High-Impact Mopar paint colors, as well as the meanings behind their creative names and the years they were available.

1955-57 Chevy 150, 210, and Bel Air Production Numbers - How Many Were Built?

From 1955 through 1957, Chevrolet produced the series of iconic vehicles that enthusiasts now refer to as Tri Five Chevy models. More than one million of these cars rolled off the assembly line every year to be distributed throughout North America and the rest of the world. However, as with any car, certain body styles and trim levels were common while others were rare. This is relevant to anyone who wishes to buy or restore a classic Chevy 150, 210, or Bel Air today, since it means that some variants will be easier to find than others. Read on as we take a look at the production numbers for each Tri Five Chevy sub-model.

Classic Mopar Engines: Slant Six, Small Block, Big Block, and 426 Hemi

Dodge and Plymouth Mopar cars of the 1960s and 1970s offered a wide array of configurations, from practical family sedans and wagons to aggressive, head-turning muscle cars. This variety of body styles was matched by a variety of colors, from elegant black and white to eye-catching SubLime, Go-Mango, and Panther Pink. Mopar engines were much the same. You could choose from a nearly-indestructible Slant Six, a plethora of small block and big block options, or even the legendary 426 Hemi. Read on as we take a look at classic Mopar engine families and configurations.

Built by Students: The SMHS Race Team's 1968 Camaro Drag Car

Classic car enthusiasts are definitely not a dying breed. For evidence of this fact, look no further than the Santa Maria High School Race Team and the passionate students who built this 1968 Camaro drag car. The SMHS Race Team is an after-school program in Santa Maria, California, where high-schoolers have a unique opportunity to learn how to build and maintain race cars. The program is funded entirely by students, with the exception of donations from sponsors. Classic Industries is proud to have provided restoration parts for this build. Read on as we delve into the details of this '68 Camaro, and how it has evolved into a 565ci big-block-powered, 9-second speed machine.