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1970 Chevy C10 - El Capitan

Patina, which can be defined as "change of a surface through age and exposure," is a polarizing subject in the classic car restoration world. Some people feel that it's a sign of a worn-out exterior that desperately needs new sheetmetal and a fresh coat of paint, while others see it as a badge of honor earned through decades of hard use. Those who fall into the latter camp often go to great lengths to preserve the cosmetic patina, and wouldn't dream of covering it up. Ruben Garcia's 1970 C10 is a nice example of this eye-catching build style.

1969 Chevy C10 - Back to Cali

Every classic car has a story that's written over the course of decades, and intertwined with various people and places. Some of these vehicles spend their entire lives in a single town, while others eventually travel across the country or cross oceans. In a few rare cases, those cars or trucks make it back home or even back to their previous owners. This 1969 Chevy C10 was originally sold in California, but its second owner took it to Texas. Javier Piseno, the truck's third owner, brought it home to the west coast once again.

63 Impala SS - Bagged Drop-Top

The Chevy Impala has been associated with the lowrider subculture since its inception, and it's easy to see why. With its long, elegant body, abundant chrome trim, powerful V8 engine options, and smooth ride, the Impala was born to cruise and look good doing it. Hydraulics have always been popular in the lowrider scene, but the development of modern air suspension systems provides a smooth-riding alternative to hydros.

1962 Chevy Impala - Cream of the Crop

If you're a car enthusiast, especially a classic car enthusiast, you'll no doubt know that air suspension can be a controversial modification. Some people love the ability to tuck big wheels and adjust ride height on the fly, while others claim air suspension degrades what would otherwise be a nicely restored classic. No matter your stance, it's hard not to appreciate a car with air suspension that looks this good. Eric Sass, the owner of this '62 Chevy Impala convertible, embraced the controversy by purchasing the car in mostly restored condition, then swapping the stock wheels and suspension for a set of 'bags and deep-dish billet wheels.