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Tech Tip: How to Repair '55 Chevy Fenders

When it comes to restoring a classic car, there are different schools of thought. Some restorers prefer to keep as much original sheetmetal as possible, which usually requires repair and patching of rusty or damaged areas. Others prefer buying original-style reproduction panels, which greatly reduces labor and ensures every seam and contour is where it should be. The good news is that Classic Industries caters to both — we have patch panels for original sheetmetal and a huge selection of reproduction body panels, too. A recent article from our friends at Modern Rodding shows both options in action on their 1955 Chevy restoration project.

The Art of Restraint: LS7-Powered 1970 Z28

When you're building a custom classic car from the ground up, there's a strong temptation to go big and bold. While we certainly appreciate flashy, show-stopping builds with bright paint and aggressive bodywork, there's also something to be said for keeping it simple. For Steve, the owner of this 1970 Camaro Z28, an understated custom was exactly what he wanted from day one. The result took 10 years to achieve, and was recently featured by the YouTube channel AutotopiaLA.

Choosing the Perfect Carpet for Your Muscle Car: Good, Better, or Best

Installing new carpet in your American muscle car or truck is a fantastic way to lay the groundwork for transforming your vehicle's interior. Sears & Roebuck Co., a renowned mail order and retail giant, popularized the Good-Better-Best approach to marketing their extensive range of products. Who can forget the exceptional quality of Sears' Best Craftsman tools that stood the test of time? Classic Industries employs a similar strategy when it comes to carpet options, ensuring that finding the perfect carpet for your ride is a breeze.

Photo Gallery & Article - The 74th Annual Grand National Roadster Show

How time flies! There have now been 74 annual Grand National Roadster Shows. The 74th GNRS took place on Friday, February 2 through Sunday, February 4, 2024, at the Pomona, CA Fairplex. Al and Mary Slonaker presented the first GNRS in 1950 in Oakland, CA. In 2004, the Grand National Roadster Show moved from Northern California to its present home at the Pomona Fairplex in Southern California.

Classic Industries Featured Restorations - Is Your Vehicle Ready?

Here's a quiz question for you that has several answers. Like with many tests, there is only one correct answer. The question is, "What do all of these cars shown in the lead photo have in common? 

Building a Dream: The Journey of Renewing a 1976 Camaro

When Robert Heil purchased his 1976 Camaro, he was 15 and didn't have a driver's license yet. It's just as well. His Camaro was missing two key items - the engine and the transmission. Over the course of the last four years, Robert has sourced all the parts he needs to get his Camaro running well and looking good.

A Journey of Love: 1972 Chevy Rally Nova That's Still Running Strong

This original Chevrolet Rally Nova was purchased new at Sunset Chevrolet in Sumner, Washington on June 13, 1972. This is one of only 33,319 built in 1972. It was purchased by my mom. She had told me, her at the time 19-year-old son and current owner, she was looking to purchase a new car and asked what I recommended. I told her that the Nova was a pretty nice car and recommended that she look into it. She headed out looking at new cars, and a few hours later she came back with a brand-new 1972 Mojave Gold Rally Nova with black vinyl top.

Video: Boyd Coddington's '89 GMC Sport Truck on Jay Leno's Garage

The sport truck movement was one of the biggest car culture hallmarks of the 1990s. From factory hot rods like the Chevy 454 SS, Ford Lightning, and GMC Syclone to countless custom builds by enthusiasts across America, the concept of high-performance pickup trucks spread like wildfire. These builds featured more powerful engines, lowered suspensions, custom paint, and sleek, aggressive styling. One of the pioneers of the sport truck movement was California-based hot rod builder Boyd Coddington. In the following video from Jay Leno's Garage, Leno and Coddington's son Chris take a closer look at the 1989 GMC that's credited with starting it all.