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1965 Mustang GT - 32 Years Together

What was the first car you owned? Even if it wasn't an exciting muscle car or glamorous luxury coupe, you probably have fond memories of your time behind the wheel. Our first cars gave us independence and allowed us to experience the thrill of the open road. Fernando Guzman, of Irvine, California, was fortunate enough to have a very cool first car, which he owns to this day. He's held onto this 1965 Mustang GT for 32 years. In fact, it's still his daily-driver.

1969 Camaro - Glacier Blue Restoration

Restoring a classic car can be a great family bonding experience. Over the years, we've met many customers who told us how revitalizing a car helped them grow closer to a spouse, sibling, or child who helped with the project. Countless memories are made turning wrenches in the garage, choosing upgrades, and cruising to car shows in the completed vehicle. For John DiIorio, of San Pedro, California, this Glacier Blue 1969 Camaro was a fantastic father-son build.

1969 Mustang - As Seen on the Silver Screen

Some of our favorite classic cars have appeared in movies, and seeing them on the silver screen makes their real-world counterparts seem even cooler. The Bullitt Mustang, Smokey and the Bandit Trans Am, and Vanishing Point Challenger are just a few noteworthy examples. You'll rarely see those star cars outside a museum, but we recently had an opportunity to photograph a Classic Industries customer's car that had a movie cameo of its own. This 1969 Mustang convertible was featured in the 2002 film Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.

1970 Ford F-100 - Low-Mile Barn Find

Trucks are naturally utilitarian vehicles, so it's no surprise that many of them lived hard lives on farms, ranches, and job sites. As a result, it's often difficult to find well-preserved examples, especially those with low miles and all-original powertrains. Only a lucky few were stashed away in garages and barns, where they could be found and restored decades later. Such was the case for this beautiful 1970 Ford F-100 barn find, now owned by Georgia Sells, of Huntington Beach, California.

1966 Mustang - A 55-Year Journey

Every classic car has a story, and it's part of what makes them so interesting. Beauty and performance can certainly be appreciated at face value, but these factors in the present are intertwined with the past. Today, we'll take a look at one Classic Industries customer's 1966 Ford Mustang that exemplifies this principle. Ben Fea bought this Mustang brand new back in '66, and he still owns it to this day.

Mercury's Second Pony Car - The 1979-1986 Mercury Capri

Photos Courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The lead photo is of a 1983 Mercury Capri RS. A high-output 5.0L V8 that is backed by a five-speed manual transmission powers the low production Capri RS.

Ford Lincoln-Mercury's second pony car was the 2nd generation Mercury Capri. For the sake of clarity and brevity, its moniker was simply the Mercury Capri, as opposed to the Ford Lincoln-Mercury Capri. Like the Mercury Cougar from 1967-1974, the 2nd generation Mercury Capri (1979-1986) shared the Mustang chassis that Ford produced at the time. This go round though Ford manufactured an all new chassis for the Ford Mustang known as the Fox platform from 1979-1993, it's 3rd generation platform for the original pony car.

The Mercury Comet - the First Midsized Car

Photos courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The lead photo is of a third generation, 1966 Mercury Comet convertible that sports a 289 CI V8, a C6 three-speed automatic trans, power steering, power brakes, a dual exhaust, has black bench front and rear seat interior, and is shod with Anthracite hued Boss five-spoke wheels. Delightful!

The Lincoln-Mercury division of Ford introduced a big sister car to the Ford Falcon in March of 1960 called the Mercury Comet. Though still classified as a compact car, the Comet was a foot longer than the Ford Falcon. Back in the day it was called a “senior compact”. Having the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, Automotive historians, now recognize the Comet as the first midsized car. 

Ford Trucks Built Tougher with Parts from Classic Industries 1932-2017

Photos courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The above second generation 1956 Ford F-100 wears a resplendent House of Kolor Ultra Orange Pearl base coat with Ultra Orange Pearl and Egyptian Gold Pearl flames, artfully applied by Jimmy Hartman from Oxnard, California's Hog Wild Creations.

The Ford Motor Company first produced a pickup truck in 1917. The truck was called a Ford Model TT. It differed from the Model T passenger car by having a heavier frame and rear axle, which gave the truck a hauling capacity of a short ton (.91 t – just shy of a ton). 

The GOAT Ford Bronco 1966-1996

Photos courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The 1969 Ford Bronco in the lead photo is affectionately named "Big Oly" for obvious reasons. Drivers Parnelli Jones and Bill Stroppe won with Big Oly in the 1971 Baja 1000, the 1972 Baja 1000, the 1973 Baja 500, and the 1973 Mint 400. The Bronco was built to Parnelli Jones' specs of being stronger, lighter, and faster. With its chrome moly tubed space frame and fiberglass and aluminum bodywork, Big Oly has a dry weight of 2,620 pounds. The go fast part is achieved with a 351 CI Ford Windsor V8 that makes 390 horses on high-octane racing fuel. Giddy up!

The Ford Falcon Flew High for A While

Photos courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The Ford Falcon was introduced on September 2, 1959, a full month ahead of its American foes, the Chevrolet Corvair and the Plymouth Valiant. Ford’s extensive market research is what led to the Falcon’s promising creation.