Classic News Blog - Imagine The Possibilities

1963 Nova Wagon - Creamsicle Chevy

Back in the day, the station wagon was viewed as the king of the practical family vehicle segment. While this body style certainly meets that need, most vehicles in this category were soon replaced by larger minivans and SUVs. Unfortunately, it has become rare to see a wagon on the road anymore — but we think that exclusivity just makes the classic ones that much cooler.

Back in the day, the station wagon was viewed as the king of the practical family vehicle segment. While this body style certainly meets that need, most vehicles in this category were soon...

1966 Charger - 408ci Resto-Mod

When someone mentions the Dodge Charger, many classic car enthusiasts will think of the iconic 1968-70 models immortalized in Hollywood productions such as The Dukes of Hazzard, Vanishing Point, and even The Fast and the Furious. While there's certainly no denying the importance and beauty of these second-gen B-body Mopars, we feel just as strongly about their predecessor: the 1966-67 Charger.

When someone mentions the Dodge Charger, many classic car enthusiasts will think of the iconic 1968-70 models immortalized in Hollywood productions such as The Dukes of Hazzard, Vanishing Point,...

1982 Camaro Restomod - Blazing Yellow Z28

Here at the Classic Industries Retail Showroom, we see countless beautiful restored cars and trucks, as well as quite a few resto-modded vehicles. The latter category covers builds ranging from a few modern modifications to complete tear-downs and rebuilds with aggressive motor swaps.

The 1982 Camaro Z28 seen here definitely falls on the more extreme end of the spectrum. In fact, it's one of the most eye-catching third-gen Camaro builds we've seen to date.

Here at the Classic Industries Retail Showroom, we see countless beautiful restored cars and trucks, as well as quite a few resto-modded vehicles. The latter category covers builds ranging from a...

1961 Impala - Bubble Top Restomod

The 1961 Impala is often referred to as a bubble top car, and when you look closely at the styling, it's not hard to see why. The A-pillars that flank the windshield have a distinct curvature, giving the impression that the front of the greenhouse is bowed outward.

Then there's the large back glass, which incorporates thin and heavily-sloped C-pillars. On the sides of the car, the frameless windows can be rolled down to reveal no central B-pillar, completing the smooth bubble appearance.

The 1961 Impala is often referred to as a bubble top car, and when you look closely at the styling, it's not hard to see why. The A-pillars that flank the windshield have a distinct curvature,...

1964 Impala SS - Sixty-Four Fanatic

Chevrolet has produced some extremely iconic cars over the years, including the '57 Bel Air and the '69 Camaro. But few models are more revered than the '64 Impala SS, especially in the custom cruiser and lowrider communities. This car has been immortalized in movies, TV shows, music, and even video games. Its long, smooth lines look just as good today as they did in 1964.

We've met many Impala fans over the years, but none have been more passionate about this car than Joe Ali, of Huntington Beach, CA. Joe currently owns two 1964 Impalas, and we previously featured his Adobe Beige '64 Impala SS on The Parking Lot. Prior to these two cars, he owned six 1965 Impalas — yes, you read that right, six.

Chevrolet has produced some extremely iconic cars over the years, including the '57 Bel Air and the '69 Camaro. But few models are more revered than the '64 Impala SS, especially in the custom...

1970 Plymouth 'Cuda - Vibrant In Violet

One of our favorite things about late '60s and early '70s Mopar cars is their use of vibrant High Impact paint colors. From Sublime and Panther Pink to Go Mango and Lemon Twist, even the names of these hues made an in-your-face statement. They also played a large role in keeping these cars memorable, even to non-car-enthusiasts. One of your friends might not know the first thing about cars, but he'll certainly turn to stare at the bright green muscle car with the roaring V8 engine.

This 1970 Plymouth 'Cuda belongs to Alex Uribe, of Redlands, California. The car is painted In Violet, which was Plymouth's name for the purple known as Plum Crazy on Dodge models.

One of our favorite things about late '60s and early '70s Mopar cars is their use of vibrant High Impact paint colors. From Sublime and Panther Pink to Go Mango and Lemon Twist, even the names of...

1969 Chevy C10 - Subtle 454 Restomod

In more ways than one, this Chevy C10 isn't what it seems. Glancing at the front end, you'll see cues that indicate it might be a 1967 or '68 model: the lower-profile hood, "Chevrolet" lettering, and grille style all match these earlier model years. The lack of side markers on the fenders and bedsides would make seem to indicate a '67 model, but the cab's large rear window says it's at least a '68 model, since 1967 trucks had a small rear window.

The owner of this truck — Darin Smith, of Huntington Beach, California — tells us it's actually a 1969 Chevy C10. Darin found the truck out in the California desert, and rebuilt it with a mixture of parts to achieve the look he wanted. He liked the appearance of the '68 front end, so he purchased a replacement hood, grille, and emblems for that model year. The fenders and bedsides bear no side markers, because he liked that clean appearance only found on the '67 trucks.

In more ways than one, this Chevy C10 isn't what it seems. Glancing at the front end, you'll see cues that indicate it might be a 1967 or '68 model: the lower-profile hood, "Chevrolet" lettering,...

1970 Camaro - Stealthy Split-Bumper

Here at the Classic Industries Retail Showroom, we often see vehicles you might call "head-turners". They're decked-out in red, yellow, green, or purple paint, airbrushed with stripes or flames, and covered in sparkling chrome galore. However, a few vehicles we see in our parking lot take things in the opposite direction with an understated stealthy look.

At first sight, this 1970 Camaro had us subconsciously humming "Paint it Black" by the Rolling Stones. Every inch of the car's exterior has been blacked-out, from the split bumpers and projector headlamp housings to the steering wheel, Wilwood disc brake calipers, and 19-inch Intro billet wheels wrapped in Pirelli tires.

Here at the Classic Industries Retail Showroom, we often see vehicles you might call "head-turners". They're decked-out in red, yellow, green, or purple paint, airbrushed with stripes or flames,...

Turning a Barnfind Into a Driver

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front yard) for decades, or just a cool car that seems unloved and underappreciated.

Unfortunately, the reality is that regardless of the kind of car it is, or how rare it is, it’s still an old car. It’s been sitting in the same spot, languishing in someone’s garage or driveway, possibly for decades. So, what if you find one, and it looks good enough to drive? Muscle Car Review published an article outlining this very situation of finding a vehicle that’s been stowed away for decades, and what to do if you want to drive it.

Photo courtesy of carsinbarns.blogspot.com

The article really drives home the need for a plan:
Start your path to revival by asking why the car was parked. Did it stop running or just get sidelined? Anything you can learn will help you fix the original problem. Beyond that, a host of things should be replaced before attempting to drive a barn find. Tires, fuel lines, and brakes need attention to make sure that your barn find doesn’t result in a junkyard donation.”

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front...

1967 Camaro SS - Rotisserie Restomod

The term "rotisserie" is often used in a culinary context, such as the whole roasted chickens that you'll find under heat lamps at the grocery store. But you'll also hear the term in the automotive restoration industry. So what does this mean in the context of a classic car?

Fortunately, rotisserie restoration has nothing to do with skewering a car over an open flame — we shudder at the thought. As you may have guessed, rotisserie restoration involves suspending the front and rear of a car on a special rack, and rotating it to access every nook and cranny of the underbody. Short of disassembling and removing the body for a full frame-off restoration, it's one of the best ways to thoroughly restore a vehicle.

This 1967 Camaro SS belongs to Graeme Chapman, of Huntington Beach, California. Graeme bought the car in 2008, and proceeded with a full rotisserie restoration to achieve the stunning results seen here.

The term "rotisserie" is often used in a culinary context, such as the whole roasted chickens that you'll find under heat lamps at the grocery store. But you'll also hear the term in the...