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'56 Chevy Bel Air - Beauty & Speed

Every classic car restoration project is a journey, and we always enjoy hearing about how our customers' navigated that long road with help from the parts in our catalogs. But being able to see the journey a vehicle went through via photos is even more rewarding. Farley Schrieber, of Ohio, sent us numerous photos documenting the two-and-a-half-year restoration process of his stunning 1956 Chevy Bel Air. This car was restored from the frame up, and now features upgraded suspension and a potent big-block V8.

1956 Chevy Bel Air - Classic Sled

Christmas has come and gone, and the jolly bearded guy clad in red and white has returned to his North Pole abode once more. We know his traditional method of transportation is a flying sleigh and pack of reindeer, but a customer recently stopped by our Retail Showroom in a vehicle that looks like it'd be a fitting four-wheeled alternative for Mr. Claus. Rudolph and his pals can take some time off, because this red and white two-tone '56 Bel Air forgoes reindeer-power in favor of good old horsepower.

1956 Nomad - Beauty and Utility

In the automotive world, it's not easy to find a balance between form and function. This is why we often see concept cars with ambitious and artistic designs that are gradually toned down to make them more livable on a daily basis. After all, a beautiful vehicle is less than ideal if it's not remotely practical or enjoyable to drive. However, the Chevrolet Nomad is one of the best examples we've seen of the perfect coalescence of form and function.

1958 Chevy Bel Air - The Tri Five's Successor

The 1955-'57 Chevy Tri Five was a hugely successful line, and to this day remains one of the greatest icons of classic American car culture. But there was a catch for General Motors. As is often the case with this degree of success, consumers' expectations were high and the Tri Five would be a tough act to follow. Knowing this, GM designers and engineers put a lot of work into its successor, the 1958 Full Size Chevy line.

'57 Bel Air Wagon - A Classic for the Whole Family

You've probably heard of the Chevy Nomad, a unique and iconic two-door wagon body style that was available only as a Tri-Five Chevy Bel Air model. The two-door Nomads are so well-known that some classic car fans will mistakenly refer to all Bel Air wagons by that name. However, aside from the two-door Nomad, there was also a four-door Bel Air wagon body style. This 1957 Bel Air wagon belongs to Dan Naughton, of San Clemente, California.

1955 Chevy Bel Air - Torn-Down & Restored

This was the year it all began for the now-famous Tri-Five Chevy. In 1955, Chevrolet released the first model year of this iconic line. The 150 and 210 models were certainly well-received, especially when outfitted with the optional V8 engine. However, the flagship Bel Air was truly a sight to behold. Its carpeted interior, chrome trim, stainless window moldings, and script emblems set this '55 Chevy apart from the rest of the line, and made it memorable to this day.

1955 Chevy Bel Air - Turquoise Gem

1955 was an important year for Chevrolet. It marked the first year of the iconic model that would eventually become known by fans as the Tri Five. The top-trim version of this Chevy model was the Bel Air, which could be ordered as either a standard two-door "post" version with a B-pillar at the midpoint of the roof, or a pillarless "hardtop" version. The '55 Bel Air also featured extra chrome trim and a selection of more than a dozen eye-catching two-tone color combinations.

Turning a Barnfind Into a Driver

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front yard) for decades, or just a cool car that seems unloved and underappreciated.

Unfortunately, the reality is that regardless of the kind of car it is, or how rare it is, it’s still an old car. It’s been sitting in the same spot, languishing in someone’s garage or driveway, possibly for decades. So, what if you find one, and it looks good enough to drive? Muscle Car Review published an article outlining this very situation of finding a vehicle that’s been stowed away for decades, and what to do if you want to drive it.

Photo courtesy of carsinbarns.blogspot.com

The article really drives home the need for a plan:
Start your path to revival by asking why the car was parked. Did it stop running or just get sidelined? Anything you can learn will help you fix the original problem. Beyond that, a host of things should be replaced before attempting to drive a barn find. Tires, fuel lines, and brakes need attention to make sure that your barn find doesn’t result in a junkyard donation.”

Collector Car Insurance is Here!

Be it your ’57 Bel Air, or Hemi Road Runner, classic vehicles have become more than just mere transportation…they’re investments. While car insurance is protection for your transportation—trying to get a standard run-of-the-mill insurance company to protect your “investment” can be problematic, at best.  As some would say in the medical field: You need a specialist.

Classic Industries Understands Collector Car Enthusiasts

Classic Industries understands the needs of enthusiasts, and are experts in filling the gap when there’s a need for high-quality parts and accessories. So, when it comes to insurance for your classic car, who better to understand the issues associated with classic car insurance, than Classic Industries? Using their vast experience, they have developed the Classic Industries Collector Car Insurance Program.

1955 Bel Air Restoration - Candy Apple Chevy

Take a good look at this 1955 Chevy Bel Air. This pristine ride belongs to Joel Sellers, of Garden Grove, California, and it's a beautiful example of a first-year Tri Five.

Of all the details to be found on Joel's '55, the thing that stands out the most is undoubtedly its Candy Apple Red paint. The hue is deep and rich, and the gloss looks so wet you might think it was painted yesterday. However, that's not the case. Far from it, in fact. Joel tells us that this paint was applied in 2000 — it sure doesn't look like a nearly 17-year-old paint job.