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"Throttle Therapy" 1965 Mustang Short Film

One of our favorite aspects of classic cars is the history behind each one. No two cars follow the exact same path as the decades and miles pass by. We've documented dozens of these stories from Classic Industries customers, so we appreciate watching other publications do the same. Petrolicious is one such channel, offering high-quality short films about a wide range of classic cars. The following video, titled "Throttle Therapy," tells the story of one man's journey with a beautiful 1965 Mustang Fastback. 

1970 Mustang Mach 1 - The Speed of Sound

Aircraft and aeronautics have been a frequent source of inspiration for cars, whether it was aesthetic elements such as cones and fins, functional aerodynamics to increase top speed and cornering capabilities, or simply their names. Most automotive historians agree that the Ford Mustang was named after the famous P-51 Mustang fighter plane, so it's no surprise that Ford continued the theme with the performance-oriented Mach 1 option package. Representing the velocity of an object equal to the speed of sound, the term Mach 1 is synonymous with going fast.

"Fully Torqued" Restores a '66 Mustang with Classic Industries Parts

We love watching classic cars get restored, whether it's in our own garage, at a local shop, or on our TV screen. Regarding the third category, we've had the privilege of working with quite a few well-known restoration TV shows over the years, including Overhaulin', Chop Cut Rebuild, All Girls Garage, and Iron Resurrection. More recently, Classic Industries was able to assist Steve Pazmany from the History TV series Fully Torqued with a few of his projects. Today, we'll take a quick look at their 1966 Mustang build that features many Classic Industries parts.

Video: Boynton Morris' 1965 Mustang Convertible

We always love to hear the stories behind our customers' restored classic cars. No two are the same, and many are closely tied to fond memories from childhood. For Boynton Morris, of Buena Park, California, the Ford Mustang was a car he admired since he was young. Over the following decades, as he restored several other classic cars, the Mustang was always in the back of his mind. One day, an acquaintance decided to sell his '65 Mustang convertible project car, and Boynton knew the time had finally come to buy it.

Fabulous Fords Forever - the 35th Edition

The Fabulous Fords Forever show made a triumphant return on Sunday, June 13, in Irwindale, California. Drawing more than 1,000 Ford cars, including Mustangs (Classic, Fox Body, SN95, New Edge, S197, S550), Falcons, Cougars, Thunderbirds, Broncos, and F100s, and thousands of Ford fans, the long-running So Cal show was a massive hit in it's first appearance at Irwindale Speedway!

1965 Mustang GT - 32 Years Together

What was the first car you owned? Even if it wasn't an exciting muscle car or glamorous luxury coupe, you probably have fond memories of your time behind the wheel. Our first cars gave us independence and allowed us to experience the thrill of the open road. Fernando Guzman, of Irvine, California, was fortunate enough to have a very cool first car, which he owns to this day. He's held onto this 1965 Mustang GT for 32 years. In fact, it's still his daily-driver.

1969 Mustang - As Seen on the Silver Screen

Some of our favorite classic cars have appeared in movies, and seeing them on the silver screen makes their real-world counterparts seem even cooler. The Bullitt Mustang, Smokey and the Bandit Trans Am, and Vanishing Point Challenger are just a few noteworthy examples. You'll rarely see those star cars outside a museum, but we recently had an opportunity to photograph a Classic Industries customer's car that had a movie cameo of its own. This 1969 Mustang convertible was featured in the 2002 film Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.

1966 Mustang - A 55-Year Journey

Every classic car has a story, and it's part of what makes them so interesting. Beauty and performance can certainly be appreciated at face value, but these factors in the present are intertwined with the past. Today, we'll take a look at one Classic Industries customer's 1966 Ford Mustang that exemplifies this principle. Ben Fea bought this Mustang brand new back in '66, and he still owns it to this day.

1979-1986 Mercury Capri History - Mercury's Second Pony Car

Photos Courtesy of Mecum Auctions, Inc.

The lead photo is of a 1983 Mercury Capri RS. A high-output 5.0L V8 that is backed by a five-speed manual transmission powers the low production Capri RS.

Ford Lincoln-Mercury's second pony car was the 2nd generation Mercury Capri. For the sake of clarity and brevity, its moniker was simply the Mercury Capri, as opposed to the Ford Lincoln-Mercury Capri. Like the Mercury Cougar from 1967-1974, the 2nd generation Mercury Capri (1979-1986) shared the Mustang chassis that Ford produced at the time. This go round though Ford manufactured an all new chassis for the Ford Mustang known as the Fox platform from 1979-1993, it's 3rd generation platform for the original pony car. In this article, we'll examine Mercury Capri history and how it changed from 1979 to 1986.

1966-1996 Ford Bronco History: "Goes Over Any Terrain"

Before the professional sports acronym G.O.A.T. came to mean "Greatest Of All Time," it was the internal project name of the Ford Bronco and stood for “Goes Over Any Terrain.” With the advantage of 20/20 hindsight, that project code name was very apropos. Thanks to the involvement of some pretty sharp individuals like Lee Iacocca and Donald Frey, there was a pretty strong chance that G.O.A.T. would be successful. History tells us that these are the very same two Ford employees who developed and created the magnificent Mustang behind Henry Ford II’s back. They also assisted Carroll Shelby with the Ford GT40 program that enabled Ford to outrun every automotive manufacturer, including Ferrari, at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race. They repeated this astonishing feat in 1967, 1968, and 1969.