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1964 Impala SS - Still in the Family

A few days ago, we received a message from Crossroads Vintage Restorations in Texas regarding a customer's 1964 Impala SS convertible that the shop recently completed. Many parts from the Classic Industries Impala parts catalog were used in this build, and the results are stunning, but there's also a fascinating story behind this car. Russ, the owner, scraped together enough cash to buy it for $700 back when he was sixteen years old. Almost forty years later, it has been fully restored to the beautiful condition seen here.

1967 Mustang - Cherry Convertible

Summer is quickly approaching, and there are few better ways to soak up its warm, sunny weather than behind the wheel of a classic car. Better yet, a convertible. Anyone who has owned such a vehicle can attest that it's almost impossible not to smile when you're cruising a smooth road with some good tunes on the radio and the wind in your hair. Spencer Brooks, of Long Beach, California, is nearing completion on his 1967 Mustang convertible restoration project, which serves as a beautiful example of this category.

1965 Impala - Sweet as Butterscotch

There's an art to crafting the perfect name to describe a vehicle. Some classic car names, such as Impala and Mustang, evoke the agility and grace of an animal. Others, such as Charger and Regal, describe the potency or refinement of the vehicle itself. However, the names of the colors used on these cars are often equally creative. Butterscotch Pearl is the color that was applied to this 1965 Impala convertible, and this name perfectly conveys the smoothness and richness of its vivid orange hue.

1968 Dodge Polara 500 - C-Body Convertible

Ever since we introduced the Classic Industries Mopar catalog in 2010, we've been known as the leading source for Dodge and Plymouth A, B, and E-body restoration parts. However, we're always working hard to expand our lines and support more vehicles. In addition to the A, B, and E-body, we've been gradually accumulating some parts for a few other Mopar platforms, such as the C-body. This 1968 Polara 500 convertible is a beautiful example of the C-body platform.

1978 Trans Am - Customized Convertible

Yes, you're reading that title correctly. Although it may not look like it, this is a 1978 Trans Am. It has been heavily modified with parts from earlier and later model years, as well as a rare convertible top conversion by National Coach Engineering. It also features some custom-molded body panels and black accents on its bright red paint. The result is a truly unique second-gen Pontiac that draws a crowd wherever it goes.

Now in the Showroom: 1969 Camaro Pace Car

Here at Classic Industries, we're more than just a restoration parts retailer. We're diehard car enthusiasts who enjoy spending time around classic vehicles just as much as you do. As a result, we've developed our own collection of cars and trucks over the years, and many of these can be seen rotating through the display space inside our Retail Showroom. The latest of these centerpiece cars is our freshly-restored 1969 Camaro Pace Car.

'62 Nova Convertible - A Decade of Restoration

Restoring a classic car is a labor of love, and that often means it takes a substantial amount of time to complete the project. As the saying goes, Rome wasn't built in a day. But ask anyone who has poured hard-earned money, sweat, and possibly even some blood into bringing their beloved car back to its flawless original condition, and they'll certainly attest that it was worth it in the long run. Ron Pinegar, of Huntington Beach, California, is no exception. His 1962 Chevy Nova convertible underwent a 10-year restoration.

1967 Dart Convertible - Top-Down Every Day

There's nothing quite like driving a convertible, especially when that convertible is a classic. Cruising with the top down and a cool breeze in your hair is one of those experiences that's bound to put a smile on your face. However, changing ambient temperature and weather conditions means you'll probably end up driving with the top up sometimes — unless you're Mario Molina. He tells us he put the top down on his 1967 Dodge Dart 10 years ago, and hasn't put it back up since then.

1965 Impala - Cross-Country Cruiser

America is a huge country, and one that's full of a tremendously diverse variety of landscapes, people, food, music, and culture. Each state and city has its own identity, famous landmarks, and beautiful sights to experience. That's why traveling across the United States is such a fun and memorable experience, especially when it's in the form of a road trip.

The cross-country road trip is a wonderful thing, and it's even better if you love to drive the open road. Miles of smooth asphalt, the wind in your face, your favorite tunes on the radio, and the thrum of an American V8 engine in the background — we'd say it doesn't get much better than that.

Turning a Barnfind Into a Driver

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front yard) for decades, or just a cool car that seems unloved and underappreciated.

Unfortunately, the reality is that regardless of the kind of car it is, or how rare it is, it’s still an old car. It’s been sitting in the same spot, languishing in someone’s garage or driveway, possibly for decades. So, what if you find one, and it looks good enough to drive? Muscle Car Review published an article outlining this very situation of finding a vehicle that’s been stowed away for decades, and what to do if you want to drive it.

Photo courtesy of carsinbarns.blogspot.com

The article really drives home the need for a plan:
Start your path to revival by asking why the car was parked. Did it stop running or just get sidelined? Anything you can learn will help you fix the original problem. Beyond that, a host of things should be replaced before attempting to drive a barn find. Tires, fuel lines, and brakes need attention to make sure that your barn find doesn’t result in a junkyard donation.”