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Tech Tip: How to Repair '55 Chevy Fenders

When it comes to restoring a classic car, there are different schools of thought. Some restorers prefer to keep as much original sheetmetal as possible, which usually requires repair and patching of rusty or damaged areas. Others prefer buying original-style reproduction panels, which greatly reduces labor and ensures every seam and contour is where it should be. The good news is that Classic Industries caters to both — we have patch panels for original sheetmetal and a huge selection of reproduction body panels, too. A recent article from our friends at Modern Rodding shows both options in action on their 1955 Chevy restoration project.

Video: '57 Chevy with Wild 8-Stage Fade Paint

For a skilled painter, every inch of a vehicle's sheet metal is blank canvas. Adding vivid color, depth, and gloss is an extremely painstaking process, but the results speak for themselves. This 1957 Chevy built by Kelly & Son Crazy Painters in California is a perfect example of how much a great paint job can transform a vehicle. However, a closer look will reveal that there's also a lot of intricate metalwork, electronics, and a potent 600-horsepower supercharged V8 under the hood. AutotopiaLA interviewed Mitch Kelly of Crazy Painters about all the details of this '57 Chevy.

Cheech Marin's 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible

Have you ever owned a car that was a true "chick magnet?" That term is not politically correct, but it most accurately describes my first car, a '55 Chevrolet Bel Air convertible. Whenever I drove it, girls would follow me around and honk their horns at me. Some would pull alongside my cool ride and want to race. If you saw this machine at the time, you might be surprised that I got such a reaction from so many women. Let's just say this Tri-Five was far removed from concours condition.

Danchuk 1955-57 Chevy Parts Still Available at Classic Industries

In 1976, Classic Industries started from a humble beginning selling reproduction carpet kits for the first-generation Camaro. That very same year, our friends at Danchuk started producing their very first 1955-57 "Tri-Five" Chevy restoration part (a '57 park light lens). Over the decades, both companies have grown in parallel. In 2012, we began working together when we introduced our 1955-57 Chevy catalog containing several parts manufactured by Danchuk. This week, Danchuk announced that it will no longer be selling parts directly to consumers, but don't worry! Classic Industries will continue to carry and sell the Danchuk Chevy 150, 210, Bel Air parts you know and love.

1957 Chevy Bel Air - Inherited from Dad

Classic cars often carry powerful memories of time spent together with family members. Whether it's the result of wrenching on the car, going to shows, or simply cruising together, these special vehicles develop into an extension of the bond between spouses, siblings, or parents and their children. This '57 Bel Air belonged to Louie Breceda's father for 45 years, so when he passed away, Louie inherited it and preserved it. In a way, Louie's dad lives on through this car.

1955, 1956, and 1957 Chevrolet Options

The Tri Five Chevy models built by General Motors in 1955, 1956, and 1957 changed substantially with each passing year. Body panels, grilles, lighting, trim, interior colors, and exterior colors all differed from year to year. In addition to these standard features, Chevrolet offered a variety of optional features for '55, '56, and '57 models. These options ranged from common choices, such as two-tone paint and whitewall tires, to much rarer choices. Read on for a list of 1955, 1956, and 1957 Chevy option codes, descriptions, and original prices.

1955-57 Chevy Bel Air, 210, and 150 Production Numbers - How Many Were Built?

From 1955 through 1957, Chevrolet produced the series of iconic vehicles that enthusiasts now refer to as Tri Five Chevy models. More than one million of these cars rolled off the assembly line every year to be distributed throughout North America and the rest of the world. However, as with any car, certain body styles and trim levels were common while others were rare. This is relevant to anyone who wishes to buy or restore a classic Chevy 150, 210, or Bel Air today, since it means that some variants will be easier to find than others. Read on as we take a look at the production numbers for each Tri Five Chevy sub-model.

1955, 1956, & 1957 Chevy Colors and Paint Codes

In our most recent weekly blog post, we provided a comprehensive guide to interior trim codes for 1955-57 Chevy cars. This week, we're moving our focus from the interior of the vehicle to the exterior. Tri Five Chevy cars were offered in a wide range of eye-catching paint colors and two-tone color combinations, and these options changed with each model year. Read on for a guide to identifying 1955, 1956, and 1957 Chevy colors and paint codes.

1955, 1956, & 1957 Chevy Interior Trim Codes

Last week on our blog, we published a comprehensive guide to decoding 1955-57 Chevy VINs and trim tags, which can help you learn more about the original specifications of your classic Tri-Five Chevy. However, there's an aspect of that article that requires more detailed explanation: interior trim codes. These three-digit numbers indicate the original interior color and material combination for each vehicle. Today, we'll list each 1955, 1956, and 1957 Chevy interior trim code and the accompanying interior color, material, and model code.

1955-57 Chevy VIN Decoder & Trim Tag Decoder

If you've ever seen a 1955-57 Chevy classic car and wondered what its original specifications were, there's one way to find out for certain: examine the VIN plate and the trim tag. These two pieces of metal were riveted onto the body of all Tri Five Chevy vehicles, and each provides some valuable information on the way they looked when they left the GM assembly line back in the 1950s. Read on to learn how to use our 1955-57 Chevy VIN decoder and trim tag decoder to find out more about your own '55-57 Chevy, or one you're thinking about buying and restoring.