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1955 Ford F-100 - LS1-Powered Pickup

Each classic car is an expression of its owner's taste and personality. Some choose to restore their vehicles to factory condition, with every last nut and bolt put back to the way it was when the vehicle left the assembly line. Others prefer to incorporate some slight modifications, such as a new set of wheels, coilover suspension, or a disc brake conversion. A few choose to diverge from tradition with major mods that speak to their independent attitude. Guy Moore, the owner of this 1955 Ford F-100, falls into the third category. That's why he decided to drop a Chevy LS1 under the hood of his Ford truck.

1970 Chevy C10 - El Capitan

Patina, which can be defined as "change of a surface through age and exposure," is a polarizing subject in the classic car restoration world. Some people feel that it's a sign of a worn-out exterior that desperately needs new sheetmetal and a fresh coat of paint, while others see it as a badge of honor earned through decades of hard use. Those who fall into the latter camp often go to great lengths to preserve the cosmetic patina, and wouldn't dream of covering it up. Ruben Garcia's 1970 C10 is a nice example of this eye-catching build style.

1954 Chevy 3100 - Built for Speed

At first glance, Rick Scott's '54 Chevy truck looks a bit rough. The cab was transplanted from an earlier split-windshield pickup. Its sheetmetal is sprayed in a mottled coat of flat black paint, the grille is dented, and both the front bumper and tailgate are missing completely. But when you take a closer look at this truck, you'll start spotting some subtle (and not-so-subtle) hints that it was built with a singular purpose: speed. Rick turned his truck into an all-out drag-racing machine.

1952 Chevy Truck - A Work In Progress

Every project vehicle has a beginning and, as the saying goes, Rome wasn't built in a day. Although we see plenty of complete builds with every last nut and bolt replaced, we also see quite a few in-progress builds, and we find these equally interesting. A partially-completed project tells a story about the journey it has been on as well as the intended destination.

2017 Super Chevy Muscle Car Challenge

Here at Classic Industries, we love providing restoration parts for vintage Chevy cars and trucks, but we also recognize that those vehicles aren't just designed to sit in a garage collecting dust. They're designed to be driven, and in many cases, driven fast.

1964 GMC Pickup - Frame-Off Desert Truck

Last week on The Parking Lot, we featured a beautiful 1969 Chevy C10 owned by Darin Smith of local restoration and performance shop DWS Classics. That truck was rescued from the desert and painstakingly rebuilt from the ground up. This week, we have another one of DWS Classics' creations: a 1964 GMC shortbed.

Like Darin's other truck, this GMC was found baking in the desert sun, and was purchased to undergo a full restoration. Fortunately, due to the low moisture of its surroundings, the truck stayed mostly rust-free. Darin stripped it down to the bare frame, and began a frame-off build.

1969 Chevy C10 - Subtle 454 Restomod

In more ways than one, this Chevy C10 isn't what it seems. Glancing at the front end, you'll see cues that indicate it might be a 1967 or '68 model: the lower-profile hood, "Chevrolet" lettering, and grille style all match these earlier model years. The lack of side markers on the fenders and bedsides would make seem to indicate a '67 model, but the cab's large rear window says it's at least a '68 model, since 1967 trucks had a small rear window.

The owner of this truck — Darin Smith, of Huntington Beach, California — tells us it's actually a 1969 Chevy C10. Darin found the truck out in the California desert, and rebuilt it with a mixture of parts to achieve the look he wanted. He liked the appearance of the '68 front end, so he purchased a replacement hood, grille, and emblems for that model year. The fenders and bedsides bear no side markers, because he liked that clean appearance only found on the '67 trucks.

1959 Chevy Apache Pickup - A Turquoise Gem


The term "shop truck" often evokes images of a rusty old pickup that has lived a hard life as a utility vehicle. Fortunately, that's not always the case. The owner of this 1959 Chevy Apache calls it his shop truck, but it's far from the sad state one might imagine for a work truck. In fact, it's in absolutely gorgeous condition.

This 1959 Apache pickup belongs to Bob Meredith, of Mission Viejo, California. You'd never know it from the spotless condition, but he uses the truck to carry supplies to and from work, and also considers it his daily-driver.

Turning a Barnfind Into a Driver

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front yard) for decades, or just a cool car that seems unloved and underappreciated.

Unfortunately, the reality is that regardless of the kind of car it is, or how rare it is, it’s still an old car. It’s been sitting in the same spot, languishing in someone’s garage or driveway, possibly for decades. So, what if you find one, and it looks good enough to drive? Muscle Car Review published an article outlining this very situation of finding a vehicle that’s been stowed away for decades, and what to do if you want to drive it.

Photo courtesy of carsinbarns.blogspot.com

The article really drives home the need for a plan:
Start your path to revival by asking why the car was parked. Did it stop running or just get sidelined? Anything you can learn will help you fix the original problem. Beyond that, a host of things should be replaced before attempting to drive a barn find. Tires, fuel lines, and brakes need attention to make sure that your barn find doesn’t result in a junkyard donation.”

Collector Car Insurance is Here!

Be it your ’57 Bel Air, or Hemi Road Runner, classic vehicles have become more than just mere transportation…they’re investments. While car insurance is protection for your transportation—trying to get a standard run-of-the-mill insurance company to protect your “investment” can be problematic, at best.  As some would say in the medical field: You need a specialist.

Classic Industries Understands Collector Car Enthusiasts

Classic Industries understands the needs of enthusiasts, and are experts in filling the gap when there’s a need for high-quality parts and accessories. So, when it comes to insurance for your classic car, who better to understand the issues associated with classic car insurance, than Classic Industries? Using their vast experience, they have developed the Classic Industries Collector Car Insurance Program.