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1928 Model A Truck - Road-Trip Ready

Classic Industries offers a huge variety of restoration parts for GM, Mopar, and Ford vehicles, and even though we only offer catalogs for certain models, many of the parts we provide can be used across a wide range of platforms and body styles. This 1928 Ford Model A resto-mod build, owned by Mikael Bjork, is one such example. We don't offer a dedicated Model A catalog, but Mikael was still able to source several components for this truck (and his other classic vehicles) from our site.

1965 Chevy C10 - Low Hauler

You may have heard the claim that lowering a truck makes it less useful, but that's not necessarily the case. Sure, if you're planning to go off-roading, reduced ground clearance isn't advantageous. However, if your truck's primary purpose is to haul items around town on paved streets, a lower bed floor can actually make it easier to load and unload. Adding an air suspension system can also offer a smoother ride and on-the-fly adjustability for a variety of practical tasks. Jeff Sharell's 1965 Chevy C10 is a good example of this build style, and gets used every day as the shop truck for his auto detailing products company.

1967 Camaro - 383 Stroker SS/RS

There are many who would say the 1967 Camaro was perfected the moment it rolled off the GM assembly line. We certainly appreciate this perspective, and have helped many purists restore their cars to exact factory specifications using original-style reproduction parts. On the other hand, some Camaro owners believe that perfection is achieved by blending the best elements of a classic with aftermarket performance parts and tasteful modern upgrades. These owners tend to favor the restomod build style.

1966 Chevy Nova - 760hp LS Swap

Take one look at this 1966 Chevy Nova, and it's clear that it falls into the restomod category. Some elements have been restored using original-style parts, while others have been modified or replaced with modern components. The lowered stance, large billet wheels, blacked-out bumpers and trim, and carbon fiber chin spoiler are all characteristic cues for this style of build. However, the changes to this Nova are much more than skin deep.

1962 Impala - Sleek Sixty-Two

Every classic car is an expression of its owner's tastes. Some prefer to restore a vehicle to immaculate original condition, with every nut and bolt the way it came from the factory. Others add subtle modifications for street driving, drop in more powerful engines for drag racing, or heavily customize their vehicles for something unique and eye-catching. Sammy Covarrubias, of Santa Ana, California, built his 1962 Chevy Impala to cruise the streets and look good doing it.

1970 Nova - It's Been Overhauled

It's every car enthusiast's worst nightmare to find out their prized vehicle has been stolen. We shudder to think about a classic car sitting safely at home one day, only to disappear the next day without a trace, never to be seen again. This awful scenario is exactly what befell Ivan Ramirez's 1970 Chevy Nova... or so he thought. In reality, the Nova was actually being dismantled and restored by none other than the crew of the hit TV show Overhaulin'.

1966 Chevy Suburban - Old-School SUV

These days, the Sport Utility Vehicle segment has become a dominant force in the automotive industry. Anywhere you look, you'll see dozens of SUVs, whether they're small crossovers or full-size family-haulers. In many cases, these versatile vehicles outnumber trucks, sedans, wagons, and hatchbacks. But back in the 1960s, the idea of an SUV was just beginning thanks to innovative models like the Chevrolet Suburban.

1956 Nomad - Beauty and Utility

In the automotive world, it's not easy to find a balance between form and function. This is why we often see concept cars with ambitious and artistic designs that are gradually toned down to make them more livable on a daily basis. After all, a beautiful vehicle is less than ideal if it's not remotely practical or enjoyable to drive. However, the Chevrolet Nomad is one of the best examples we've seen of the perfect coalescence of form and function.

1951 Chevy 3100 - Restored 5-Window

In 1947, Chevrolet launched a major redesign of its pickup truck offerings, known as the Advance Design series. One of the most distinctive features of these trucks was the Deluxe Cab option, which included a pair of curved "Nu-Vue" corner windows at the back of the cab, increasing visibility and giving the truck an open feel. This remains a sought-after design today. Enthusiasts typically refer to it as the "5-window" Chevy.

1964 Impala - Open-Air Cruiser

These days, if you want a taste of the windswept convertible experience but don't want a car with a soft top, you can always look for a vehicle with a sunroof. However, it wasn't always so easy. Back in the 1960s, models with an optional sunroof were few and far between, and power-operated ones were even rarer. Chris Howder, of Lakewood, California, wanted a sunroof on his '64 Impala, so he sourced one from a Cadillac and had it retrofitted into the Chevy's roof.