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What is a Tri Five Chevy? - 1955, 1956, & 1957 Chevrolet Identification Guide

Many who are new to the classic car world have wondered, "what is a Tri Five Chevy?" The nickname Tri Five is used to represent a specific set of classic Chevrolet vehicles, namely the iconic 1955, '56, and '57 Chevrolet cars. This includes the well-known One-Fifty, Two-Ten, Bel Air, and Nomad models, as well as lesser-known sub-models such as the Delray coupe, and Handyman, Townsman, and Beauville wagons. In this article, we'll take a detailed look back at the various configurations, paint codes, and some noteworthy optional accessories for the 1955-57 Chevy Tri Five.

1955 - 57 Chevy Restoration: 6 Timeless Classics

The 1955 - 57 Chevy is one of the most quintessential and beloved American cars of all time. In just three years, Chevrolet changed the course of automotive history with each iteration of the economical 150, elegant 210, and luxurious Bel Air, so it's no surprise that classic car enthusiasts are still enamored with the Tri Five. And more than 60 years later, they're still taking on '55 - 57 Chevy restoration projects to keep these vehicles on the road, with help from parts found in the Classic Industries catalog.

'56 Chevy Bel Air - Beauty & Speed

Every classic car restoration project is a journey, and we always enjoy hearing about how our customers' navigated that long road with help from the parts in our catalogs. But being able to see the journey a vehicle went through via photos is even more rewarding. Farley Schrieber, of Ohio, sent us numerous photos documenting the two-and-a-half-year restoration process of his stunning 1956 Chevy Bel Air. This car was restored from the frame up, and now features upgraded suspension and a potent big-block V8.

'56 Chevy 210 - LS-Swapped Tri Five

The 1955-57 Chevy "Tri Five" is an undeniable classic that has remained popular and desirable across generations of automotive enthusiasts. Its sleek lines and elegant curves look just as good today as they did at Chevrolet dealers more than six decades ago. As time passes, it brings new trends, and the Tri Five has been adapted to fit many of them, from gassers to hot rods to modern pro-street or pro-touring builds. And of course, many of these vehicles have been restored to original condition or lightly resto-modded to fit the owner's taste.

1956 Chevy Bel Air - Classic Sled

Christmas has come and gone, and the jolly bearded guy clad in red and white has returned to his North Pole abode once more. We know his traditional method of transportation is a flying sleigh and pack of reindeer, but a customer recently stopped by our Retail Showroom in a vehicle that looks like it'd be a fitting four-wheeled alternative for Mr. Claus. Rudolph and his pals can take some time off, because this red and white two-tone '56 Bel Air forgoes reindeer-power in favor of good old horsepower.

1955 Chevy Bel Air - Old-School Gasser

Modifying production cars into race machines is nothing new. Ever since the automobile was invented, enthusiasts, tinkerers, and adrenaline junkies have been figuring out creative ways to squeeze every last drop of performance out of these four-wheeled conveyances. However, many distinct build styles have stemmed from this mission. In the late 1950s and early '60s, the "gasser" style grew in popularity, and even today it remains instantly recognizable. This '55 Bel Air is a beautiful example of this historically-significant hot rod category.

1956 Nomad - Beauty and Utility

In the automotive world, it's not easy to find a balance between form and function. This is why we often see concept cars with ambitious and artistic designs that are gradually toned down to make them more livable on a daily basis. After all, a beautiful vehicle is less than ideal if it's not remotely practical or enjoyable to drive. However, the Chevrolet Nomad is one of the best examples we've seen of the perfect coalescence of form and function.

'57 Bel Air Wagon - A Classic for the Whole Family

You've probably heard of the Chevy Nomad, a unique and iconic two-door wagon body style that was available only as a Tri-Five Chevy Bel Air model. The two-door Nomads are so well-known that some classic car fans will mistakenly refer to all Bel Air wagons by that name. However, aside from the two-door Nomad, there was also a four-door Bel Air wagon body style. This 1957 Bel Air wagon belongs to Dan Naughton, of San Clemente, California.

1957 Chevy Bel Air - Retired in Style

After decades of hard work, retirement can provide a welcome period of relaxation and time to pursue hobbies. But Ron Keller, of Huntington Beach, California, wanted more than to spend his retired days on the golf course. Instead, he decided to take on a long-term restoration project for one of his all-time favorite classic cars: the 1957 Chevy Bel Air.

1955 Chevy 210 - A Gift for Dad

Although the top-of-the-line Chevy Bel Air has always been popular among classic car fans, we've been pleased to see an increased trend of restoring other variants of the Tri-Five as well. Some of this is due to the popularity of Bel Air models making unrestored examples harder to find, but it's also a result of a growing appreciation for the entire line offered by Chevrolet from 1955 to 1957. If you ask us, all Tri-Fives are cool, from 150 to 210 and Bel Air to Nomad.