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1969 Chevy Nova - Pure Muscle

Although the Nova was originally based on the Chevy II, a thrifty and practical commuter vehicle, this memorable name quickly grew to represent a true high-performance muscle car. There's no doubt that the Nova SS could hold its own on the street or the drag strip, but even base-model Novas have often been modified to produce tire-melting power from a small block V8 engine.

1969 Nova - 427ci Super Sport

Back in 1969, the Nova SS could be purchased from any Chevrolet dealer with the standard 350ci small-block V8 or optional 396ci big-block. But some enthusiasts felt there was no replacement for displacement, and wanted more. The iconic Yenko Nova came with a 427ci V8, but those very special cars were rare back then, and they're far rarer today. This led some Nova buyers to follow in the Yenko's footsteps and install 427 big-blocks into their own cars.

'62 Nova Convertible - A Decade of Restoration

Restoring a classic car is a labor of love, and that often means it takes a substantial amount of time to complete the project. As the saying goes, Rome wasn't built in a day. But ask anyone who has poured hard-earned money, sweat, and possibly even some blood into bringing their beloved car back to its flawless original condition, and they'll certainly attest that it was worth it in the long run. Ron Pinegar, of Huntington Beach, California, is no exception. His 1962 Chevy Nova convertible underwent a 10-year restoration.

1967 Nova - A 500,000-Mile Classic

Every classic car has a story, and this is one reason they're so intriguing to us. Sometimes when we photograph customer car in our Retail Showroom parking lot, the owner has a few photos, documents, or anecdotes to help share that history with us. But TJ, the owner of this Butternut Yellow 1967 Nova, had more than that. In fact, he handed us a typed statement that told us all about his Nova ownership experience.

1973 Nova SS - A "Hybrid" Build

If someone mentions owning a "hybrid" vehicle, most people assume it's a Prius or some other ordinary commuter car powered by a combination of gasoline and electricity. However, the term actually represents anything made by combining two different elements. So in a broader sense, a hybrid build can also be a vehicle that blends visual elements rather than powertrain components. Case in point: this 1973 Nova SS might not look like a '73 at first glance, since it features a front-end conversion with parts from the previous model year.

1969 Nova - Yenko/SC 427 Tribute

For fans of classic Chevy vehicles, the name Yenko is a real attention-getter. The first-gen Yenko/SC Camaro was a true high-performance icon of the late '60s, and its legacy lives on to this day through modern cars such as the 1,000-horsepower 2018 Yenko/SC Stage II Camaro. But the Yenko name was also applied to other Chevrolet vehicles, including the Corvair, Chevelle, and Nova.

1971 Chevy Nova - 350 Resto-Mod

The third-generation 1968-74 Chevy Nova is an extremely versatile platform. Many of these Nova models, especially the inline-6 cars and four-door sedans, were used as utilitarian family vehicles. However, the '68-74 Nova also became popular among drag racers and hot-rodders due to the potential of its small-block V8, and this potential remains to this day.

1963 Nova Wagon - Creamsicle Chevy

Back in the day, the station wagon was viewed as the king of the practical family vehicle segment. While this body style certainly meets that need, most vehicles in this category were soon replaced by larger minivans and SUVs. Unfortunately, it has become rare to see a wagon on the road anymore — but we think that exclusivity just makes the classic ones that much cooler.

1972 Chevy Nova - One-Owner Project Car

Time has a way of changing most things in life. As the years pass, new relationships form, families grow, career paths develop, and hobbies change. That's why it's so impressive to come across a one-owner classic car. Over the course of four and a half decades, most people go through several vehicles. It takes a special individual to stay dedicated to one car for that long.

This 1972 Chevy Nova belongs to D.J. Jimenez of Garden Grove, California. He tells us he is the original owner, and after all this time, he knows every inch of the car. D.J. recently retired, so he plans to utilize some of his newly-acquired free time to restore it.

D.J.'s Nova might not look like it needs much restoration, since he has kept it in excellent shape over the years. The stock 350ci V8 was worn out after 20 years of use, and D.J. dropped in a replacement 350 engine, which has served him well for over 40,000 miles. The car has retained its rare original floor-shift Saginaw 3-speed manual.

1964 Chevy Nova - Original-Style Restoration

When restoring a classic car, there are plenty of paths to choose. You can build it into an aggressive custom, add modern touches to make a reliable daily-driver, or simply restore it to exact original specifications. The third option is what Robert Falcone, of Huntington Beach, California, chose for his 1964 Chevy Nova.