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1965 Chevy C10 - Low Hauler

You may have heard the claim that lowering a truck makes it less useful, but that's not necessarily the case. Sure, if you're planning to go off-roading, reduced ground clearance isn't advantageous. However, if your truck's primary purpose is to haul items around town on paved streets, a lower bed floor can actually make it easier to load and unload. Adding an air suspension system can also offer a smoother ride and on-the-fly adjustability for a variety of practical tasks. Jeff Sharell's 1965 Chevy C10 is a good example of this build style, and gets used every day as the shop truck for his auto detailing products company.

1971 Chevy C10 - Stepside Shop Truck

Darin Smith is a lifelong car guy. He grew up helping out at his father's tire shop, then did a stint as a service writer at a dealership. Eventually, he opened a shop of his own, not far from the Classic Industries Retail Showroom in Huntington Beach, California. Now Darin spends his days restoring classic cars and living his dream. When the need arose for a shop truck for local parts runs, he opted for something more distinctive than a brand-new pickup, and bought this 1971 Chevy C10.

'72 GMC Truck - Custom Workhorse

If you owned an auto restoration shop, how would you advertise your skills? Sure, you could spend big bucks on billboards, TV commercials, and print ads, or you could cut to the chase and build a vehicle that shows off what you can really do. That's exactly what Edgar Hernandez did to promote his business, Starlite Rod & Kustom Shop, in Torrance, California. The slick customized '72 GMC C30 dually seen here is the result of his efforts. Even better, it's not just a show vehicle. It also serves as the parts hauler for the many restoration projects he works on.