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1947-2007 Chevy Truck Generations - Quick Reference Guide

Over the course of six decades from 1947 to 2007, Chevrolet trucks went through many changes. The most substantial of these changes serve as the dividing lines between Chevy truck generations. If you're a classic truck enthusiast, you're probably able to spot these body style cues and recall the corresponding model year ranges, but those who are new to classic trucks may not be so well-versed. With this in mind, we put together a clear and concise visual guide to 1947-07 Chevy truck generations.

1960-1972 Chevy Truck History & Model Year Differences

Last week, we created a visual guide to identifying 1947-1959 Chevy trucks, including some of the subtle changes and options for each model year. This week, we're continuing that theme to cover more recent 1960-1972 GM trucks. If you've ever seen one of these classic trucks and wondered what year it is, or you're curious if the restoration parts on your truck match its original specifications, read through our 1960-72 Chevy truck history guide below.

1947-1959 Chevy Truck Model Years Identification Guide

Chevrolet trucks have changed a lot over the years, with each model year and generation offering unique features that helped them redefine what a pickup was capable of. Classic Industries is committed to supplying owners of these timeless pickups with restoration parts, but we're also committed to preserving their legacy. To this end, we've created a visual guide to help you identify Chevy truck model years and learn about their differences. In this article, we'll cover 1947-1959 Chevrolet trucks one year at a time.

1955 Ford F-100 - LS1-Powered Pickup

Each classic car is an expression of its owner's taste and personality. Some choose to restore their vehicles to factory condition, with every last nut and bolt put back to the way it was when the vehicle left the assembly line. Others prefer to incorporate some slight modifications, such as a new set of wheels, coilover suspension, or a disc brake conversion. A few choose to diverge from tradition with major mods that speak to their independent attitude. Guy Moore, the owner of this 1955 Ford F-100, falls into the third category. That's why he decided to drop a Chevy LS1 under the hood of his Ford truck.

1970 Chevy C10 - El Capitan

Patina, which can be defined as "change of a surface through age and exposure," is a polarizing subject in the classic car restoration world. Some people feel that it's a sign of a worn-out exterior that desperately needs new sheetmetal and a fresh coat of paint, while others see it as a badge of honor earned through decades of hard use. Those who fall into the latter camp often go to great lengths to preserve the cosmetic patina, and wouldn't dream of covering it up. Ruben Garcia's 1970 C10 is a nice example of this eye-catching build style.

1969 Chevy C10 - Back to Cali

Every classic car has a story that's written over the course of decades, and intertwined with various people and places. Some of these vehicles spend their entire lives in a single town, while others eventually travel across the country or cross oceans. In a few rare cases, those cars or trucks make it back home or even back to their previous owners. This 1969 Chevy C10 was originally sold in California, but its second owner took it to Texas. Javier Piseno, the truck's third owner, brought it home to the west coast once again.

1965 Chevy C10 - Low Hauler

You may have heard the claim that lowering a truck makes it less useful, but that's not necessarily the case. Sure, if you're planning to go off-roading, reduced ground clearance isn't advantageous. However, if your truck's primary purpose is to haul items around town on paved streets, a lower bed floor can actually make it easier to load and unload. Adding an air suspension system can also offer a smoother ride and on-the-fly adjustability for a variety of practical tasks. Jeff Sharell's 1965 Chevy C10 is a good example of this build style, and gets used every day as the shop truck for his auto detailing products company.

1954 Chevy 3100 - Built for Speed

At first glance, Rick Scott's '54 Chevy truck looks a bit rough. The cab was transplanted from an earlier split-windshield pickup. Its sheetmetal is sprayed in a mottled coat of flat black paint, the grille is dented, and both the front bumper and tailgate are missing completely. But when you take a closer look at this truck, you'll start spotting some subtle (and not-so-subtle) hints that it was built with a singular purpose: speed. Rick turned his truck into an all-out drag-racing machine.

1966 Chevy Suburban - Old-School SUV

These days, the Sport Utility Vehicle segment has become a dominant force in the automotive industry. Anywhere you look, you'll see dozens of SUVs, whether they're small crossovers or full-size family-haulers. In many cases, these versatile vehicles outnumber trucks, sedans, wagons, and hatchbacks. But back in the 1960s, the idea of an SUV was just beginning thanks to innovative models like the Chevrolet Suburban.

1951 Chevy 3100 - Restored 5-Window

In 1947, Chevrolet launched a major redesign of its pickup truck offerings, known as the Advance Design series. One of the most distinctive features of these trucks was the Deluxe Cab option, which included a pair of curved "Nu-Vue" corner windows at the back of the cab, increasing visibility and giving the truck an open feel. This remains a sought-after design today. Enthusiasts typically refer to it as the "5-window" Chevy.