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1963-1976 Dodge Dart History - A Versatile A-Body Mopar Car

Although many of the most well-known classic cars are full-size vehicles, American automakers have made some great compact cars as well. The Dodge Dart is one prominent example of this fact. This model, which was built on the Mopar A-Body platform from 1963 through 1976, offered a range of configurations from practical six-cylinder commuters to potent V8 muscle cars. Today, we'll take a look back at each step in the evolution of Dodge Dart history from '63 to '76.

Dodge Interior Restoration: Mopar Connection's 1969 Super Bee Rallye Dash Project

When it comes to classic car restoration, it's no surprise that most owners place a strong focus on exterior paint and body work, as well as mechanical components such as the engine, transmission, suspension, and brakes. These elements define how a car looks on the outside, and how it performs on the road. But think about this: where do you, the owner, spend most of your time? Behind the wheel, of course. For this reason, it's certainly worthwhile to pay attention to the interior, as Mopar Connection magazine did with their recent Dodge interior restoration project.

Mopar Paint: Dodge & Plymouth High-Impact Paint Colors

The late 1960s and early 1970s were a groundbreaking time for American culture, music, and of course cars. Many consider this to be the pinnacle of the muscle car era, a period when vehicles were getting wilder than ever before, with aggressive styling, raucous V8 engines, and eye-catching color schemes. Mopar cars were at the forefront of this movement, and have become famous for their High-Impact colors that debuted between 1969 and 1971. Today, we'll be looking back at these High-Impact Mopar paint colors, as well as the meanings behind their creative names and the years they were available.

Classic Mopar Engines: Slant Six, Small Block, Big Block, and 426 Hemi

Dodge and Plymouth Mopar cars of the 1960s and 1970s offered a wide array of configurations, from practical family sedans and wagons to aggressive, head-turning muscle cars. This variety of body styles was matched by a variety of colors, from elegant black and white to eye-catching SubLime, Go-Mango, and Panther Pink. Mopar engines were much the same. You could choose from a nearly-indestructible Slant Six, a plethora of small block and big block options, or even the legendary 426 Hemi. Read on as we take a look at classic Mopar engine families and configurations.

How to Identify Classic Dodge and Plymouth A, B, and E-Body Vehicles

Back in the 1960s and 1970s, Dodge and Plymouth produced some truly fantastic vehicles, which many enthusiasts now refer to as Mopar cars. Classic Dodge models such as the Dart, Charger, and Challenger, and Plymouth models such as the Valiant, Barracuda, and Road Runner, are timeless icons of that era. However, if you're new to Mopar cars, it can be difficult to tell the difference between model years and platforms (the A-body, B-body, and E-body). That's why we've created an illustrated reference guide to help you identify classic Dodge and Plymouth cars.

1960-76 Mopar Production Numbers - How Many Cars Did Dodge & Plymouth Build?

The Mopar A, B, and E-body platforms of the 1960s and 1970s include many legends of the muscle car era. It's no surprise that popular models such as the Charger, Challenger, 'Cuda, and Road Runner are highly desirable today. We've developed a wide selection of restoration parts for Mopar vehicles, and this process has helped us gain some insight into the original release of these classic muscle cars. Today, we'll take a look back at Mopar history and examine the estimated production numbers, determining the approximate number of A, B, and E-body Dodge and Plymouth vehicles built each year between 1960 and 1976.

1968 Dodge Polara 500 - C-Body Convertible

Ever since we introduced the Classic Industries Mopar catalog in 2010, we've been known as the leading source for Dodge and Plymouth A, B, and E-body restoration parts. However, we're always working hard to expand our lines and support more vehicles. In addition to the A, B, and E-body, we've been gradually accumulating some parts for a few other Mopar platforms, such as the C-body. This 1968 Polara 500 convertible is a beautiful example of the C-body platform.

1973 Charger - A Mopar Mixture

Over the years, we've seen quite a few restomod builds arrive at the parking lot in front of our Retail Showroom. This category of vehicles combines original-style restoration parts with modern components to create a unique blend of old and new. Many restomods add only a handful of subtle changes under the skin, and some take this further, replacing the entire engine and suspension with brand-new parts. However, few restomods we've seen are as extreme as this 1973 Charger. In fact, so many of its parts have been swapped out that some might say the term doesn't adequately describe it.

1969 Super Bee - Six Pack for the Track

Classic muscle cars were built for speed, whether it was at the drag strip, on a road course, or between stop lights on the street. These days, with many of them restored to immaculate condition and prices climbing higher for preserved examples, it's understandable that most of these cars live more relaxed lives than they did in the '60s and '70s. However, Chris Thompson still takes his 1969 Super Bee on cross-country road trips and often puts the pedal to the metal at the track. Every horsepower under the hood of this muscle car still gets used to the fullest.

1963 Dodge 330 - Ramcharger 426

Many of the great muscle car innovations were born from a desire to beat the competition at the drag strip. In the early '60s, automakers were cramming the largest and most potent V8 motors they had into ordinary production models, then stripping out weight, upgrading suspension components, and installing wider tires to create specialized track cars. Such was the case for Chrysler when its engineers took a 1963 Dodge 300 and dropped a Ramcharger 426ci V8 under the hood.