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1968 Dodge Polara 500 - C-Body Convertible

Ever since we introduced the Classic Industries Mopar catalog in 2010, we've been known as the leading source for Dodge and Plymouth A, B, and E-body restoration parts. However, we're always working hard to expand our lines and support more vehicles. In addition to the A, B, and E-body, we've been gradually accumulating some parts for a few other Mopar platforms, such as the C-body. This 1968 Polara 500 convertible is a beautiful example of the C-body platform.

1973 Charger - A Mopar Mixture

Over the years, we've seen quite a few restomod builds arrive at the parking lot in front of our Retail Showroom. This category of vehicles combines original-style restoration parts with modern components to create a unique blend of old and new. Many restomods add only a handful of subtle changes under the skin, and some take this further, replacing the entire engine and suspension with brand-new parts. However, few restomods we've seen are as extreme as this 1973 Charger. In fact, so many of its parts have been swapped out that some might say the term doesn't adequately describe it.

1969 Super Bee - Six Pack for the Track

Classic muscle cars were built for speed, whether it was at the drag strip, on a road course, or between stop lights on the street. These days, with many of them restored to immaculate condition and prices climbing higher for preserved examples, it's understandable that most of these cars live more relaxed lives than they did in the '60s and '70s. However, Chris Thompson still takes his 1969 Super Bee on cross-country road trips and often puts the pedal to the metal at the track. Every horsepower under the hood of this muscle car still gets used to the fullest.

1963 Dodge 330 - Ramcharger 426

Many of the great muscle car innovations were born from a desire to beat the competition at the drag strip. In the early '60s, automakers were cramming the largest and most potent V8 motors they had into ordinary production models, then stripping out weight, upgrading suspension components, and installing wider tires to create specialized track cars. Such was the case for Chrysler when its engineers took a 1963 Dodge 300 and dropped a Ramcharger 426ci V8 under the hood.

1969 Barracuda - Pop's Mopar

As classic car owners, we often develop a close connection with our vehicles and feel that they're irreplaceable. It's an understandable result of investing so much time, money, and sweat into making them look and run like new again. But few owners have a closer bond with their cars than those who inherited them from a family member. Angel Garrido received this 1969 Barracuda from his father, who bought it brand new in November of 1968. It's practically a four-wheeled member of the family at this point.

1973 'Cuda - 500ci Mopar Power

Mopar cars of the early 1970s are well-known for their array of eye-catching High Impact colors, such as Plum Crazy, Sublime, Go Mango, and Panther Pink. Those vibrant hues were impossible to miss, and closely associated with the in-your-face attitude of these classic Dodge and Plymouth muscle cars. But even without brightly-colored paint, these vehicles have immense presence on the road. This 1973 'Cuda is a perfect example of what we mean.

1972 Road Runner - Reborn Mopar

Classic cars were made to be driven, and the best way to appreciate them is from behind the wheel with an open road ahead. However, there's an inherent element of risk every time a car leaves the garage. Whether it's the result of a distracted driver or an honest mistake, there's always a chance that another motorist might crash into your prized vehicle. That's exactly what happened to this 1972 Road Runner. Fortunately, Thelma Garcia was able to rescue the damaged Plymouth and restore it to its original condition.

1964 Plymouth Valiant - Practicality & Fun

In 1960, Plymouth introduced the new Valiant as a compact alternative to larger full-size models such as the Belvedere, Fury, and Savoy. The first-generation Valiant bore assertive styling cues that included protruding fins alongside the body, angled oval tail lamps, and a faux spare tire on the trunk lid. For the 1963 model year, Plymouth redesigned the Valiant with clean lines and simplified styling. This change was well-received by the public, leading to an uptick in sales for the little Plymouth.

1969 Dart GTS - A-Body Muscle

When it comes to Mopar muscle cars, many people tend to think of E-body vehicles such as the Dodge Challenger and Plymouth 'Cuda, or B-body vehicles like the Dodge Charger and Plymouth Road Runner. The Mopar A-body served as a platform for smaller and more economical cars like the Dodge Dart and Plymouth Valiant. However, the A-body also proved it could hold its own in the muscle car arena.

1969 Dodge Dart GT - 430,000 Original Miles

We're always impressed to hear about "survivor" cars, found in barns or dusty garages in all-original condition with extremely low miles. However, it's just as cool to see vehicles at the opposite end of the spectrum. Some classic cars are daily-driven year after year, decade after decade, racking up miles and soldiering on with incredible reliability. Such is the case for this 1969 Dodge Dart GT. Its slant-6 engine has covered nearly 430,000 miles without a single rebuild.