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1968 Camaro - LS3-Powered Restomod

The Chevrolet Camaro is unquestionably one of the most iconic American cars of all time, but it shares this high level of prestige with its big brother, the Corvette. These two-door sports cars from General Motors have shared real estate in dealership showrooms for decades, and even though they're not direct competitors, they do share similar characteristics and a similar spirit. So, when Ryan Duncan set out to rebuild his '68 Camaro, he decided to drop in the heart of a Corvette: an LS3 V8 motor. After all, a little sharing among siblings is a good thing.

1965 Chevy C10 - Low Hauler

You may have heard the claim that lowering a truck makes it less useful, but that's not necessarily the case. Sure, if you're planning to go off-roading, reduced ground clearance isn't advantageous. However, if your truck's primary purpose is to haul items around town on paved streets, a lower bed floor can actually make it easier to load and unload. Adding an air suspension system can also offer a smoother ride and on-the-fly adjustability for a variety of practical tasks. Jeff Sharell's 1965 Chevy C10 is a good example of this build style, and gets used every day as the shop truck for his auto detailing products company.

1972 Camaro SS - LS3 Power

The Chevrolet Camaro has been an icon of performance and speed for more than five decades. Its blend of a sleek exterior and raucous V8 engine has carried on across generations. Today, some choose to restore these vehicles to factory-fresh original condition, while others have fused elements of early and late Camaro models to create something unique. This second-gen 1972 Camaro SS falls into the latter category, with an LS3 V8 and 6-speed manual transmission transplanted from a fifth-gen model.

'56 Chevy 210 - LS-Swapped Tri Five

The 1955-57 Chevy "Tri Five" is an undeniable classic that has remained popular and desirable across generations of automotive enthusiasts. Its sleek lines and elegant curves look just as good today as they did at Chevrolet dealers more than six decades ago. As time passes, it brings new trends, and the Tri Five has been adapted to fit many of them, from gassers to hot rods to modern pro-street or pro-touring builds. And of course, many of these vehicles have been restored to original condition or lightly resto-modded to fit the owner's taste.

1966 Chevy Nova - 760hp LS Swap

Take one look at this 1966 Chevy Nova, and it's clear that it falls into the restomod category. Some elements have been restored using original-style parts, while others have been modified or replaced with modern components. The lowered stance, large billet wheels, blacked-out bumpers and trim, and carbon fiber chin spoiler are all characteristic cues for this style of build. However, the changes to this Nova are much more than skin deep.

1966 Chevy Suburban - Old-School SUV

These days, the Sport Utility Vehicle segment has become a dominant force in the automotive industry. Anywhere you look, you'll see dozens of SUVs, whether they're small crossovers or full-size family-haulers. In many cases, these versatile vehicles outnumber trucks, sedans, wagons, and hatchbacks. But back in the 1960s, the idea of an SUV was just beginning thanks to innovative models like the Chevrolet Suburban.

1960 Impala - LS3 Restomod

1960 was a unique year for the Chevy Impala. That year, it followed the aggressive aircraft-inspired look of the 1959 model but preceded the more subdued 1961 redesign. As a result, its styling falls somewhere in between the two. It retains the prominent "bat wing" rear fins, but pairs them with a sleeker front grille, and replaces the '59 model's large teardrop tail lamps with three conical lamps on each side.

1971 GMC Pickup - Candy Red Restomod

With its quad headlamps and distinctive crosshair-shaped grill, the 1967-72 GMC pickup truck diverges slightly from the appearance of its more-common Chevy sibling. These trucks exude classic style, even today, making them a popular choice for restoration projects.

1970 Chevy Blazer - Open-Air Interior

For companies in the automotive industry, one of the best ways to show off parts and services is to create a unique shop car or truck. This vehicle serves as a rolling billboard to showcase what a company can do, and draws a crowd at car shows or national events such as SEMA. Classic Industries has built quite a few shop cars over the years, including a 1969 Camaro, 1966 Nova, 1964 Impala SS, and 1953 Chevy truck.

1969 Camaro SS - Father-Son Project

Restoring a classic car can be a great bonding experience that bridges the gap between generations. A parent may have fond memories of driving a specific car during their youth, and can share that with their children, allowing them to make memories of their own behind the wheel. Seeing through a restoration project to completion isn't always easy, but it's certainly a worthwhile endeavor.