Classic News Blog - Imagine The Possibilities

1964 Impala SS - Sixty-Four Fanatic

Chevrolet has produced some extremely iconic cars over the years, including the '57 Bel Air and the '69 Camaro. But few models are more revered than the '64 Impala SS, especially in the custom cruiser and lowrider communities. This car has been immortalized in movies, TV shows, music, and even video games. Its long, smooth lines look just as good today as they did in 1964.

We've met many Impala fans over the years, but none have been more passionate about this car than Joe Ali, of Huntington Beach, CA. Joe currently owns two 1964 Impalas, and we previously featured his Adobe Beige '64 Impala SS on The Parking Lot. Prior to these two cars, he owned six 1965 Impalas — yes, you read that right, six.

Chevrolet has produced some extremely iconic cars over the years, including the '57 Bel Air and the '69 Camaro. But few models are more revered than the '64 Impala SS, especially in the custom...

1968 Camaro - Displacement Replacements

It's not uncommon these days to come across a classic car that has undergone an engine swap. In fact, for some models, there are many more examples that have been swapped than those that retain the original-spec engine. However, it's certainly less common to see a vehicle that has gone through as many different engines as this 1968 Camaro.

The '68 Camaro seen here belongs to Steve Koster, of Huntington Beach, California. Those who are familiar with these cars might guess it has a 327, 350, or even a 396. While it likely rolled off the factory floor with one of those engines, it's long gone now.

It's not uncommon these days to come across a classic car that has undergone an engine swap. In fact, for some models, there are many more examples that have been swapped than those that retain...

1970 Plymouth 'Cuda - Vibrant In Violet

One of our favorite things about late '60s and early '70s Mopar cars is their use of vibrant High Impact paint colors. From Sublime and Panther Pink to Go Mango and Lemon Twist, even the names of these hues made an in-your-face statement. They also played a large role in keeping these cars memorable, even to non-car-enthusiasts. One of your friends might not know the first thing about cars, but he'll certainly turn to stare at the bright green muscle car with the roaring V8 engine.

This 1970 Plymouth 'Cuda belongs to Alex Uribe, of Redlands, California. The car is painted In Violet, which was Plymouth's name for the purple known as Plum Crazy on Dodge models.

One of our favorite things about late '60s and early '70s Mopar cars is their use of vibrant High Impact paint colors. From Sublime and Panther Pink to Go Mango and Lemon Twist, even the names of...

1969 Chevy C10 - Subtle 454 Restomod

In more ways than one, this Chevy C10 isn't what it seems. Glancing at the front end, you'll see cues that indicate it might be a 1967 or '68 model: the lower-profile hood, "Chevrolet" lettering, and grille style all match these earlier model years. The lack of side markers on the fenders and bedsides would make seem to indicate a '67 model, but the cab's large rear window says it's at least a '68 model, since 1967 trucks had a small rear window.

The owner of this truck — Darin Smith, of Huntington Beach, California — tells us it's actually a 1969 Chevy C10. Darin found the truck out in the California desert, and rebuilt it with a mixture of parts to achieve the look he wanted. He liked the appearance of the '68 front end, so he purchased a replacement hood, grille, and emblems for that model year. The fenders and bedsides bear no side markers, because he liked that clean appearance only found on the '67 trucks.

In more ways than one, this Chevy C10 isn't what it seems. Glancing at the front end, you'll see cues that indicate it might be a 1967 or '68 model: the lower-profile hood, "Chevrolet" lettering,...

Turning a Barnfind Into a Driver

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front yard) for decades, or just a cool car that seems unloved and underappreciated.

Unfortunately, the reality is that regardless of the kind of car it is, or how rare it is, it’s still an old car. It’s been sitting in the same spot, languishing in someone’s garage or driveway, possibly for decades. So, what if you find one, and it looks good enough to drive? Muscle Car Review published an article outlining this very situation of finding a vehicle that’s been stowed away for decades, and what to do if you want to drive it.

Photo courtesy of carsinbarns.blogspot.com

The article really drives home the need for a plan:
Start your path to revival by asking why the car was parked. Did it stop running or just get sidelined? Anything you can learn will help you fix the original problem. Beyond that, a host of things should be replaced before attempting to drive a barn find. Tires, fuel lines, and brakes need attention to make sure that your barn find doesn’t result in a junkyard donation.”

It’s every car enthusiast’s dream to participate in a barnfind. To discover a car of their childhood, a rare and highly sought after muscle car that had been stowed away in a garage (or front...

1967 Camaro SS - Rotisserie Restomod

The term "rotisserie" is often used in a culinary context, such as the whole roasted chickens that you'll find under heat lamps at the grocery store. But you'll also hear the term in the automotive restoration industry. So what does this mean in the context of a classic car?

Fortunately, rotisserie restoration has nothing to do with skewering a car over an open flame — we shudder at the thought. As you may have guessed, rotisserie restoration involves suspending the front and rear of a car on a special rack, and rotating it to access every nook and cranny of the underbody. Short of disassembling and removing the body for a full frame-off restoration, it's one of the best ways to thoroughly restore a vehicle.

This 1967 Camaro SS belongs to Graeme Chapman, of Huntington Beach, California. Graeme bought the car in 2008, and proceeded with a full rotisserie restoration to achieve the stunning results seen here.

The term "rotisserie" is often used in a culinary context, such as the whole roasted chickens that you'll find under heat lamps at the grocery store. But you'll also hear the term in the...

1972 Chevy Cheyenne - The $1 Pickup

One dollar doesn't get you much these days. You can head down to the local fast food restaurant and buy an item off the value menu, or here in California, you can put about 1/3 gallon of gas in your car. Even at the dollar store, many items you'll find on the shelves cost more than a buck. That's why Robert Henderson, of Costa Mesa, CA, calls his 1972 Chevy Cheyenne the "best deal ever" — he bought it for just $1.

As you might imagine, there's more to the story of this purchase. This truck originally belonged to Robert's grandfather, who bought it brand new in March 1972 for $4,010. Robert's grandfather drove it almost every day for the next 40 years, racking up nearly 500,000 miles. In 2013, he finally decided to let the truck go, and generously passed it on to Robert for a measly $1.

One dollar doesn't get you much these days. You can head down to the local fast food restaurant and buy an item off the value menu, or here in California, you can put about 1/3 gallon of gas in...

Buick Regal Catalogs Now Available

Classic Industries, the recognized leader in the restoration parts industry, has recently announced the addition of 1978-87 Buick Regals catalog line. From its aggressive design to the well-fortified option list; the 2nd generation Buick Regal’s popularity has always been steady.

Classic Industries, the recognized leader in the restoration parts industry, has recently announced the addition of 1978-87 Buick Regals catalog line. From its aggressive design to the...

1967 Chevy Caprice - Pristine Cruiser

While some have jokingly referred to the full-size Chevy coupes and sedans of the late '60s and early '70s as "land yachts", no one can deny that these sleek cruisers exude style. The long hoods, sweeping rear haunches, big V8 engines, and bright chrome trim on these classic Chevy models remind us of a time when extravagance and luxury was par for the course.

The 1967 Chevy Caprice pictured here belongs to Mike Forster, of Fountain Valley, California. Believe it or not, this car is almost entirely unrestored. Mike's uncle purchased the car new from the dealer, and put just 48,000 miles on the car since then.

While some have jokingly referred to the full-size Chevy coupes and sedans of the late '60s and early '70s as "land yachts", no one can deny that these sleek cruisers exude style. The long hoods,...

Yenko Corvette on duPont Registry Cover!

Whether it’s luxury homes, plush yachts, or one-of-a-kind supercars, the duPont Registry features the exclusive; the top of the heap, the crème de la crème. The Registry has featured SVE cars before, when the Yenko/SC® 800hp Camaro was featured in the February 2017 issue of the duPont Registry, so, imagine seeing the Yenko/SC® Corvette on the cover of such an august publication. Not that we’re surprised; because the Yenko/SC® Corvette is a top-notch supercar, so it’s only fitting to be counted among such an elite class of vehicles, especially the ones on the cover—Dodge Demon, Plymouth Superbird, and Yenko/SC® Corvette.

There have been many cars produced under the Yenko name: Camaro, Nova, Stinger (Corvair), but never an official Corvette. Yes, there have been many Corvettes sold through the Yenko dealership, and some may have even been specially tuned at that location, or may even sport a Yenko badge, but there has never been an official Yenko/SC® Corvette ever produced, until now.

Whether it’s luxury homes, plush yachts, or one-of-a-kind supercars, the duPont Registry features the exclusive; the top of the heap, the crème de la crème. The Registry has featured SVE cars...